EFFECTS OF COMMON GERM-LINE GENETIC VARIATION IN CELL CYCLE GENES ON OVARIAN CANCER SURVIVAL 

This paper investigated a popular hypothesis that common genomic variations affecting the cell cycle would influence the course of disease in ovarian cancer. The authors did not find support for the hypothesis, but left open the future possibility of finding smaller effects with larger patient cohorts.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Somatic alterations have been shown to correlate with ovarian cancer prognosis and survival, but less is known about the effects on survival of common inherited genetic variation. Of particular interest are genes involved in cell cycle pathways, which regulate cell division and could plausibly influence clinical characteristics of multiple tumors types.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

We examined associations between common germ-line genetic variation in 14 genes involved in cell cycle pathway (CCND1, CCND2, CCND3, CCNE1, CDKN1A, CDKN1B, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN2C, CDKN2D, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and RB1) and survival among women with invasive ovarian cancer participating in a multicenter case-control study from United Kingdom, Denmark, and United States. DNAs from up to 1,499 women were genotyped for 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that tagged the known common variants (minor allele frequency > or = 0.05) in these genes. The genotypes of each polymorphism were tested for association with survival by Cox regression analysis.

RESULTS:

A nominally statistically significant association between genotype and ovarian cancer survival was observed for polymorphisms in CCND2 and CCNE1. The per-allele hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.16 (1.03-1.31; P = 0.02) for rs3217933, 1.14 (1.02-1.27; P = 0.024) for rs3217901, and 0.85 (0.73-1.00; P = 0.043) for rs3217862 in CCND2 and 1.39 (1.04-1.85; P = 0.033) for rs3218038 in CCNE1. However, these were not significant after adjusting for multiple hypothesis tests.

CONCLUSION:

It is unlikely that common variants in cell cycle pathways examined above associated with moderate effect in survival after diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Much larger studies will be needed to exclude common variants with small effects.

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